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BBQ Post Script

07/05/2010

Well, the ribs were outstanding.

The sauce seemed a bit tangy alone, but it was fantastic on the smoked ribs. We used this Kansas City BBQ sauce recipe found on AmazingRibs.com.

For the pre-cooking, we smoked the ribs using Emeril’s smoker bags. The ribs cooked perfectly in the 90 minutes suggested and had nice flavor without overwhelming smokiness. We were a little worried that both the rub and the smoke might be too intense, but they weren’t at all. And the smoker bags made it easy to pack the ribs for transport.
Ribs on the Grill
That’s all the good stuff. The bad thing about smoker bags is that they do release a lot of smoke. Our apartment still smells like a BBQ pit, and while that may be fine for a private home, it’s not kosher for an apartment building like ours. We should have closed the kitchen door and put a fan in the window to vent the smoke outside, but even with all of the windows open, it filled the apartment and outer hallway. At least it wasn’t cloudy cigarette smoke pouring out to engulf our neighbors. In fact, you couldn’t really see it; it was more like the smell of smoke than actual puffs.
The Final Product
So, while we were very pleased with the overall results of our first rib experiment, I doubt we’ll be able to repeat the meal—at least, not here, and not inside. Next time, the smoker bags go on the grill.

Also on the menu were Julia Child’s delicious American potato salad, spicy cole slaw, corn on the cob, and yummy BBQ chicken. Our group did well with assembling one of the best holiday feasts ever.
Chicken

As for the pecan pie, I thought the filling was overcooked when it came out of the oven, but then it tasted just fine. No Karo Pecan Pie The recipe calls for the middle to be jiggly when the pie is done, but mine was completely firm at 60 minutes. In fact, the center was a bit loose when we ate it, but that’s because it didn’t chill long enough. My fault. I forgot to put it into the fridge on time. It was still quite tasty, however, and if you’re not into corn syrup, it’s a good substitute for the standard Karo pie. It’s just a bit more finicky. Click on the thumbnail for a jpg of the recipe, which is from Diane Unger in Cook’s Country, Oct/Nov 2009.

The kids (not ours) also made a fresh-berry pie with fruit they’d picked that afternoon. They did a nice job.
Kids' Berry Pie
All in all, it was an excellent Fourth of July. Very few leftovers remain today, which is probably a good thing. Already had potato salad for breakfast. Looks like chicken and pie for lunch.

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From → Desserts, Food

2 Comments
  1. Stephanie permalink

    It wasn’t a good substitute for the Karo pie. It was an excellent *replacement* for the Karo pie. No Karo pecan pie will ever be as good as the one you last made.

    • mkc permalink

      Thanks. And actually, the Karo pie that’s common now really is a contemporary take on the original from pre-HFCS times. So it’s really coming around full circle.

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